Too funny. . .

Every now and again I like to indulge my curiosity by taking random “quizzes” on various topics–just to see where I stand or fall.  A while ago, I took a quiz on which eschatological view I most likely espouse.  I participated in this quiz simply because I always wondered how my beliefs on such things would be categorized–if they could be.  (Now, I know that this short little quiz is not going to give a definitive answer on this; but I do think it is able to give a basic overview of where certain tendencies reside).  After taking the quiz, I was given the following result: 

You scored as a Moltmannian Eschatology

(ratings compared to the other eschatological views):

Moltmannian……………95%
Preterist………………….80%
Amillenialist…………….75%
Postmillenialist…………50%
Premillennialist…………30%
Dispensationalist………15%
Left Behind………………..5%

Explanation: Jürgen Moltmann is one of the key eschatological thinkers of the 20th century. Eschatology [for Moltmann] is not only about heaven and hell, but God’s plan to make all things new. This should spur us on to political and social action in the present.  

I found this to be rather intriguing given the fact that, at the time of taking the quiz, I had never read a single thing by Moltmann.  I have since read through a couple of Moltmann’s works, and I have come to see where the above eschatological results make (some) sense.  There is a lot in Moltmann where I find myself in agreement; but there are portions where he and I simply part ways.  

I must admit that I was a bit surprised by the post- and pre-millennialist numbers; but the ambiguity in some of the questions most likely contributed to those figures.  I was, however, deeply and utterly shocked by the presence of any percentage related to Dispensationalism and especially the Left Behind theology position.  I felt as though I needed to go and dip myself seven times in the Jordan River. 

This morning, I found a new quiz which equally piqued my interest: Which Theologian Are You?  I took this quiz for much the same reason as I did the eschatological one–I wanted to see how I would be categorized based on my beliefs about various issues.  For those of you who know me–especially my theological tendencies and allegiances–the results of this morning’s quiz are far too humorous not to mention:

You scored as a John Calvin

(ratings in comparison with theologians)

John Calvin………………………..60%
Jonathan Edwards……………….60%
Anselm……………………………..60%
Karl Barth………………………….53%
Jürgen Moltmann………………..53%
Friedrich Schleiermacher……..47%
Paul Tillich………………………..40%
Charles Finney…………………..33%
Augustine…………………………27%
Martin Luther…………………….27%

Explanation: Much of what is now called Calvinism had more to do with his followers than Calvin himself, and so you may or may not be committed to TULIP, though God’s sovereignty is all important.

I painfully admit that I have read nothing from Charles Finney (nor do I even know who he is), and I have only looked through a smattering of Paul Tillich’s work.  However, having read through much of the other theologians listed, I can see how such figures would emerge–primarily because there is much in such writers that I thoroughly enjoy and many of their thoughts have certainly been influential on my thinking. (It was interesting to see Moltmann on the list, given my prior “association” with him with regard to eschatology).

The reason this quiz was humorous to me–and possibly to those who know me–is because I am adamantly opposed to much of what Calvin concludes (especially in the areas of “predestination” and “divine foreknowledge”), and I am even more opposed to the tight categories of TULIP theology (much of which is developed by later Calvinist writers).  If anything, I find myself to be more in agreement with a somewhat lesser recognized theologian named, Luis de Molina.[1]  Regardless of the agreements or disagreements, seeing such results is always interesting and rather enlightening.  

Feel free to take either or both of the quizzes and let me know how you stand or what you thought about them.   

________________________________________________________
[1] For more on Molina, see this entry in the Catholic Encyclopedia; for more on his theological contributions (and why I tend to agree with him), see the article by William Lane Craig (“Middle Knowledge, A Calvinist-Arminian Rapprochement?”) in, The Grace of God and the Will of Man (1989), 141-64.

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One comment

  1. I just noticed your end times quiz results. I took it a while back. 100% Amillennial, 90% Moltmannian, and 80% Preterist. Everything else was below 25%, and I scored 0% on Left Behind. 🙂

    I really need to read Moltmann sometime soon – I have his Theology of Hope, and The Crucified God was also recommended to me. I also have Volf’s Exclusion and Embrace on my reading list – my understanding is that he studied under Moltmann and was greatly influenced by him.

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