that was close

During my lunch hour tootle around the internet, I found this video of a close call on a snowy motorway. I think if it were me driving the car, I would need to stop at the next services and purchase some new pants. More than anything, I’m thankful to see/hear that Matthew (the driver), his (unnamed) passenger, the lorry driver and anyone else involved were unharmed in the incident.

Near the less significant side of my gratitude, I was pleased to learn that the camera was dashboard-mounted and not in Matthew’s hand, which I admittedly first assumed. (Although, when you consider the plethora of instances where drivers are filming things, my assumption does have a bit of reasonableness to it). I was also relieved by the fact that Matthew is probably one of the few people who used the word, ‘literally’ in the correct way. (I cringe at the misuse of ‘literally’ about as much as I do with the misuse of ‘actually’).

However, where my gratitude starts to fade is with the nearly incessant repetition of the incident. (I felt like I was listening to Christian praise and worship music). Seriously: five replays in the span of about a minute. It’s not like I’m watching the replays thinking that it might turn out differently. Moreover, I was a bit insulted by the fact that the reporters felt the need, on the third replay, to isolate the shot, by greying out everything else, so that I could see the lorry destroying the barrier. Oh, so the lorry destroying the barrier the first two times was not what I was supposed to see? My mistake. Replay it again.

Where I have zero gratitude is with the decision to title the story, ‘Driver films near miss with lorry.’ I’ve ranted about this before, so my comments here will be few. I fully accept that the English dictionary supplies ‘avoided collision’ as a possible definition for ‘near miss’, but I have to fully disagree simply because it just doesn’t make any sense. I have to defer to (and agree with) George Carlin on this one.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s